Leaving the Scene of an Accident: An Overview of New York VTL Section 600(1) & (2)

According to New York State Law, a person involved in an automobile accident where property damage or personal injury has been caused may not leave the scene of the accident without first sharing his personal details such as license, insurance information.

Leaving the Scene of an Accident Where Property Damage Occurred

New York VTL 600(1) says that if a driver involved in an auto accident knows or has reason to know that property damage has occurred, then the driver is required to stay at the scene of the accident in order to provide:

  • his driver’s license and proof of insurance; and
  • his name, address, insurance carrier and driver’s license number to the other party.

A person convicted of violating NY VTL 600(1)(a) prohibiting leaving the scene of an accident where property damage occurred may be punished by a fine up to $250 and/or imprisonment of up to fifteen days.  In addition, New York Department of Motor Vehicles will tack 3 points on his driving record.

A holder of a commercial driver’s license (CDL) convicted of violating New York VTL 600(1)(a), may have his license revoked for one year.  This punishment can be crippling for a CDL driver because his livelihood likely depends on his ability to drive.

The revocation of the CDL holder’s driving privileges is even more of a punishment.  When a driver’s license is suspended, it is a loss for a fixed period that when the suspension time ends, the driver can restore his license by simply paying the restoration fee of $25.  In contrast, a license revocation is for a minimum period which continues until the driver restores his license by reapplying for a license and being approved by DMV.

Leaving the Scene of an Accident Where Personal Injury Occurred

New York’s Vehicle and Traffic Law (VTL) Section 600(2)(a) states that if a driver is involved in an accident and knows or has reason to know that personal injury to another occurred, he must stop at the scene to provide to the injured person or a police officer:

  • his driver’s license and proof of insurance; and
  • information about the driver’s name, address, insurance carrier and driver’s license

A conviction for failing to exhibit your license and insurance identification in violation of NY VTL 600(2)(a) constitutes a class B misdemeanor.  Any subsequent such violation is considered a class A Misdemeanor.  Any further violation committed by a person who previously has been convicted of such a violation will be charged as a Class E Felony.

A violation of VTL 600(2)(a) other than for the mere failure to exhibit a license and insurance information where the physical injury involved results in death or serious physical injury also constitutes a Class E Felony.

Call an Experienced NewYork Traffic Attorney

If you received a ticket for violating leaving the scene of an accident in New York, you need expert legal defense to avoid license revocation or points.

The following two tabs change content below.